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Oil Storage Tank History and Features

Background of the Oil Storage Tanks
Invented in Russia
The first rectangular metal tank was built in the USA in 1864. The world's first cylindrical oil storage tank made of riveted steel sheets was built by Vladimir Grigorievich Shukhov in Baku in 1878, commissioned by the Nobel Oil Company. Prior to this, oil had been stored at Russian fields in open-air ponds.

In 1883 Shukhov proved in his work "Mechanical Structures of the Oil Industry" that the optimal shape of a tank is a cylinder, covered at the top with a conical or flat roof, with optimal wall thickness. Shukhov investigated stress distribution using 4th degree differential equations.

V.G. Shukhov standardised the main typical dimensions, so over 20,000 oil storage tanks were built in Russia according to his drawings before 1917 alone. Modern cylindrical oil storage tanks are still built according to the principles developed by Shukhov.
The legacy of V.G. Shukhov (1853-1939)
1878
The Russia's first Balakhani — Baku oil pipeline.
1896
The world's first hyperboloid structure.
1896
Rotunda pavilion for the All-Russia Exhibition in Nizhny Novgorod.
1912
Thermal cracking unit.
1878
The Russia's first Balakhani — Baku oil pipeline.
1896
The world's first hyperboloid structure.
1896
Rotunda pavilion for the All-Russia Exhibition in Nizhny Novgorod.
1912
Thermal cracking unit.
Why clean oil storage tanks?
To reduce the risk of self-ignition of pyrophoric deposits.
For routine maintenance and inspections.
To increase the usable volume.
To change the product.
Oil Storage Tanks cleaning features
Oil Storage Tanks cleaning features
Equipment
Communications
The use of assembled modular machinery
The manhole is used for service personnel access inside the tank, including for tank cleaning.

Typical manhole dimensions:
  • oval 600 х 900mm;
  • round Ø 500, 600 and 800mm.
Compact or assembled modular machinery for mechanical cleaning is required.

A powerful, and therefore large and heavy, washing system can only get into an oil storage tank in parts through the narrow manhole.
The use of assembled modular machinery
The manhole is used for service personnel access inside the tank, including for tank cleaning.

Typical manhole dimensions:
  • oval 600 х 900mm;
  • round Ø 500, 600 and 800mm.
Compact or assembled modular machinery for mechanical cleaning is required.

A powerful, and therefore large and heavy, washing system can only get into an oil storage tank in parts through the narrow manhole.
Long cables and powerful pumps
Oil storage tanks are manufactured in accordance with GOSTR 52 910-2008, if necessary, equipped with heating system and heat insulation. The main storage item is oil.

Typical tank dimensions:
  • capacity, thous. m3 — 100/50/30/20/10/5;
  • diameter, m — 85/61/46/40/34/23;
  • height, m — 18/18/18/18/12/12.

The length of hoses and cables connecting base to the robotic unit is min. 85 m.
Long cables and powerful pumps
Oil storage tanks are manufactured in accordance with GOSTR 52 910-2008, if necessary, equipped with heating system and heat insulation. The main storage item is oil.

Typical tank dimensions:
  • capacity, thous. m3 — 100/50/30/20/10/5;
  • diameter, m — 85/61/46/40/34/23;
  • height, m — 18/18/18/18/12/12.

The length of hoses and cables connecting base to the robotic unit is min. 85 m.
Compliant with GOST safety standards
Hazardous area classification IEC 60 079−10:2002
Cleanping equipment must be intrinsically safe for "Zone 0".

Specifically:
  • Materials: stainless steel, aluminium, brass;
  • Drive: hydraulic or pneumatic;
  • Low displacement and rotation speeds.
    Hazardous area classification IEC 60 079−10:2002
    Cleanping equipment must be intrinsically safe for "Zone 0".

    Specifically:
    • Materials: stainless steel, aluminium, brass;
    • Drive: hydraulic or pneumatic;
    • Low displacement and rotation speeds.